Search

Catering to the public procurement sector

Published on: 2014-09-17

Description:

Public procurement authorities can set an influential example for industry and consumers alike whilst contributing to raising awareness about the importance of sustainable development.

Details:

Public procurement authorities can set an influential example for industry and consumers alike whilst contributing to raising awareness about the importance of sustainable development.

In some countries public procurement professionals are legally required to take a comprehensive and measured approach when purchasing PVC products. These decisions have great impact at European, national and regional levels and hence even municipal choices can help setting the right precedent and lead by example when it comes to material choice.

In a study on the 'Total Cost of Ownership' (TCO), Professor Marangoni (Bocconi University, Italy) looked at three key PVC applications - windows, pipes and flooring - taking into account all costs associated with a product over its entire life-cycle. The results showed that PVC products provide the lowest 'whole life cost' in each of the application examined. Some public bodies have conducted their own TCO studies on PVC products and alternatives reaching similar results.

In Carmarthenshire, United Kingdom, a 7-year investment and refurbishment plan by the city council (started in 2005) saw the installation of PVC-U windows, doors, fascias, soft fittings and rainwater goods
for 1,620 residential properties. The municipality is also recycling up to 400 first generation PVC-U windows per week.

Also in the UK, Liverpool, the city council worked with Liverpool Mutual Homes (LMH) to install PVC-U windows with an 'A' energy rating. LMH Project Officer Jodie Powell said residents had remarked on how the new windows have made their homes much warmer and have improved the external appearance of the properties.

As reported by the Solinger Tageblatt, the use of PVC products for door and window systems is once again permitted in the renovated or newly built municipal buildings of Solingen in Germany.

The city's Finance Committee lifted a restriction passed by the Environment Committee in 1992 and in doing so, paved the way for PVC products.

According to the City Council, the installation of PVC windows and doors leads to savings of around 70,000 euros per year in comparison to other materials. These potential savings have been highlighted by the renovation of the Geschwister-Scholl- Gesamtschule secondary school, for which the use of PVC products will save around 385,000 euros.

Thumbnail:

Show on page(s):